Started in 1978

Incorporated in 1979

35+ Years of

Committed Excellence

Leading Provider

Of Industrial Solutions
  • 297 Goddard Irvine, CA 92618, USA
  • Toll free: 800.231.4603

FAQ

Common Questions

Can you make a Bent Oval Feed Thru?

a. No

Can you make a serrated Bent Oval?

a. Yes

Can you make handheld punches?

a. Yes

Can you make punches out of stainless steel?

a. Yes we can. We can make it out of 316 Stainless, 440C Stainless, or 17-4 Stainless. 316 is the softest, non-heat treatable, out of the stainless steel materials. For a harder punch that can be heat treated, we can make it out of 440C or 17-4.
b. 17-4 and 440C can rust since it has Iron in it.

Can you put Punchout in Bent Ovals?

a. No

Do Feed Thru’s come in inside or center bevel?

a. No. They only come as an outside bevel.

Do you make punches in millimeter sizes?

a. Yes we do. Our standard Decimal Tube Punches are millimeter sizes.

Matrix Troubleshooting

a.Corrugated Crease Fracturing

i.   Re-verify the creasing specifications – recalculate and re-measure.
ii.   Re-check grain/flute direction.
iii.   Flex paperboard to determine grain direction or observe flute lines in corrugated.
iv.   Check for one-sided creasing. Is it running gripper to trail?
v.   Check for worn cutting rules that will cause creases to bottom out in channel.
vi.   How many layers of spot tape?
vii.   Zone makereadies raise all components of diecutting including creases, embossing, and even reverse half-cuts.

b.Matrix breaks on press

i.   Either the crease rule is not correct in height or channel width is not correct.

c.Matrix moves or migrates

i.   Plate is not clean or oil free. Clean plate to remove all dirt, film and oils.

d.Matrix comes off steel when cutting.

i.   Make sure to use a cutter with an anvil and not a shearing mechanism such as scissors.

e.Board cracks after it goes to folder

i.   Check the formulas on the crease rule height. This problem is generally caused by not enough impression/delaminating of fiberboard.

f.Nick breaks on press

i.   Possible that the height of matrix is too high and creating too much draw. Check Rubbering technique.

g.Angel hair on board

i.   Possible that the height of matrix is too high and creating too much draw. Check Rubbering technique.

h.Board is dry and cracking when using normal matrix size

i.   Use next wider size of matrix.

i.Board does not stay folded. Keeps straightening out.

i.   If you are using the matrix size you normally use, you may have to go one size smaller if board is wet. If not check formula for crease rule height and matrix width.

j.Cracking on lead edge of cylinder press

i.   Make sure die is built with crease rule in vertical direction being .005” lower.
Standard heights on punches:

a.Tube: .918”, .937”, 1”, 1-1/8”, 1-1/4”,1-1/2”
b.Decimal Tube: .937”
c.Straight Wall:.937”
d..007: .937”
e.Serrated Tube: .970”, .990”, 1”, 1.023”
f.Cup:.918”, .937”
g.Pin Point: .937”
h.Small Cutting Diameters: .937”
i.Bent Oval: .937”
j.Feed Thru:.937”
k.Heavy Duty Feed Thru: .937”
l.Side Outlet: .937”
m.Heavy Duty Side Outlet:.937”
n.Serrated Side Outlet: 1”
o.Hangover Side Outlet: .937”
p.Side Outlet Oval: .937”
q.Square Side Outlet: .937”
r.Rectangle Side Outlet: .937”
s.Square Cavity: .937”
t.Star Punch: .937”
u.Seamless Hangover: .918”, .937”, 1”, 1-1/8”, 1-1/4”, 1-1/2”, 2”
v.Joiners: .937”
w.KrossKut: .937”

What are the standard wall thicknesses?

a.Tube

i.   .049 Wall for 3/16” Base
ii.   .065 Wall for 1/4” Base and larger

b.Feed Thru

i.   .049 Wall for Regular
ii.   .028 Wall for thin wall
iii.   .018 Wall for extra thin wall
What are you smallest cut sizes you can manufacture?

a.Side Outlet:.020”
b.Heavy Duty Side Outlet:.020”
c.Heavy Duty Feed Thru:.020”
d.Feed Thru.020”
e.Tube:.020”
f.Straight Wall:.049”
g.Cup : 1/64”
h..007: .035”
i.Serrated Tube:1/8”
j.Machined Side Outlets:3/64”
k.Star Punch:1/8”
l.Joiners:1/16”
m.KrossKut:.047”

What is a feed thru?

a. Cutting punches used in cutting dies which have clearance built into them so that the material being die cut in the punch flows up through the punch and ejects out the back of the punch. Used mainly to cut gaskets and seals.

b. If you have any other questions regarding terminology. Please take a look at our Glossary page (hyperlink to the actual Glossary).

What is the difference between a heavy duty and a regular punch?

a. The main difference between a heavy duty and a regular punch is the shoulder length. A heavy duty punch has a .250 long shoulder to cut thicker material while a regular punch has a .150 long shoulder.

What is the difference between Mangnum and regular Punchout?

a. Magnum Punchout is harder and can eject harder material than regular Punchout

What is the largest cut size you can do on a tube?

a.The largest cut size we can manufacture as a Tube is 4.621”. This is due to our constraints on the material size we can hold onto in our manufacturing process. The largest base size we can manufacture a punch on is a 4-5/8” base.

What is the lifespan of a punch?

a. There is no way to accurately answer this question. It depends on many factors, i.e. the material the punch is made out of, the heat treat specifications, the material it is cutting, how it is cutting, etc. There are too many variable to give an accurate answer.

What is the smallest spring size?

a. The smallest spring size is a number 1 spring which can fit into a .090” hole. If the cut size of the punch you are requesting is smaller than .094” due to our minimum .002” support bevel, we cannot put a spring in it.

What is the tallest punch you can make?

a. The tallest punches we can manufacture accurately is 6”. Any taller than that and we will not be able to hold the height to our normal tolerances. This of course will vary from part to part. Smaller diameter punches pose greater problems the taller they become, while bigger diameter punches are easier to control at taller heights.

What is your standard punch tolerance?

a. Cut: ±.002”
b. Base: ±.002”
c. Height: ±.001”

Commonly Used Terms

Base:

The base is the body of the punch which the cut edge is machined onto. Bases come in round, square, and rectangular standard. We can manufacture custom shaped bases on request. The base should always have a plus tolerance. Our standard tolerance is +.002/-.000 from requested size on smaller diameter parts. The larger the diameter of our tubing punches, depending on the material, the tolerance can be anywhere from +.005-.010/-.000. On custom machined parts, our bases will be +.002/-.000.

Bevels:

The bevel is referring to the location of the cut in reference to the base and the Inside Diameter of the wall. There are three standard types of bevels… Center, inside, and outside. Center bevel is the most common of the three. Depending on what your goal is for the job in terms of scrap, different bevels will give you different results. An inside bevel is best if you are trying to keep the outside of the cut un-distorted. An outside bevel works best if you are trying to keep the slug you cut out un-distorted. A center bevel works for most purposes.

Bridge:

The bridge is the space between the shoulder ant the top of a self-cleaning exhaust. The bridge provides extra material in between the outside bevel of the punch and the exhaust to provide strength and keep the punch from breaking.

Cavity:

A cavity is a machined pocket on the inside of the cut edge. This pocket can vary in depth depending upon the application or machining limitations. A standard cavity depth should be 5/16″ to accommodate standard die ejection.

Chamfer:

A chamfer is a 45-degree angle machined onto the bottom of a punch. This allows the punch to be inserted into the dieboard without shaving the sides of the hole.

Cut Edge:

The cut edge is the end of the punch which cuts your product. The cut angle usually varies from 20 -30 degrees per side. The smaller the cut edge angle, the less pressure it takes to cut – therefore preventing a distorted cut. With a smaller angle, the cut edge also becomes thinner and weaker. This could cause cracking or nicking of the punch if not handled properly, if it is cutting tough or hard material, or if it is cutting with too much pressure. All cut edges are machined, unlike rule, which may be ground or shaved.

Exhaust – Feed-Thru:

The feed thru exhaust is a standard + .030 larger than the cut size of the punch and usually has the same shape as the cut. All feed thru punches must be used in conjunction with a bolster plate.

Exhaust – Chisel:

The chisel style exhaust is used when the bridge of a punch exceeds approximately 1-1/8″. Above this length, the punch may flex over the bridge area. The slug is cut in half and exits the punch in two pieces.

Exhaust – Self-Clean:

A self-clean exhaust comes out the side of the part. The self-clean exhaust allows the scrap material to be pushed out and ejected from the side of the part without having to use ejection. The exhaust opening must be located higher than the dieboard height. This will prevent the slug getting caught on the edge of the dieboard as it is ejecting and causing punch failure.

Exhaust –End-clean:

An end-clean exhaust style comes out the end of the punch instead of the side. It works the same way the self-cleaning exhaust does.

Heat Treat:

Most common tube punches are made of low carbon steel and must have carbon added to achieve the desired hardness. This is known as “case hardening”. The case is usually .003 -.005 surface hardened and about 58/60 Rockwell “C” scale. High carbon / tool steel punches can be neutral hardened because the steel already contains carbon. These punches are through hardened and work best at about 48/52 Rockwell.

Height:

Height is the overall length from the top of the cut edge to the bottom of the punch. The height of the punch is precision ground to assure the proper tolerance.

Knurl:

Knurls are mostly commonly found on self-cleaning punches. The knurl is machined onto the bottom of the punch and is approximately 1/4 long. A knurl resembles the rough surface of a ratchet handle. The straight knurl is cut into base of the punch and raises the surface approximately +.010 from the base diameter. The purpose of the knurl is to hold. It stops the punch from turning therefore keeping the correct alignment of the exhaust hole to the routed dieboard.

Nicks:

A nick is a slit taking out of the cut edge of various sizes or depths. The purpose of a nick is so that the slug stays in the die cut part. As the slug remains partially connected to the material, it is easier to handle without the slug falling out. Nicks should be evenly spaced, symmetrical, around the cut edge. A nick is usually about .012-.030 wide depending upon your requirements.

Pins:

Pins are another method to keep a punch from turning in the dieboard. Most commonly, they are used to keep the punch from falling out or being pulled through the dieboard by the material.

Punchout:

A method of ejecting scrap from punches using rubber ejection. There are two types of punchout, our standard and magnum. Standard punchout can be used on most jobs requiring rubber ejection. Magnum punchout is our harder ejection rubber used for ejection of hard materials that our standard punchout would fail on.

Serrations:

The purpose of the serration is to relieve the cutting pressure so that the punch does not crush or tear the material when cutting. The most common materials die makers require serrated punches are corrugated and foam rubber. When cutting material containing string or threads the serrated punch often works best. The serrations on the punch will minimize scaving (hour glassing) of the material. Serrated punches must cut deeper than the backing plate to pierce all the way through the material, therefore they must always cut into a soft pad. The most common teeth per inch are 8-12 for corrugated and 12-14 “shallow profile” for cutting foam.Any tooth per inch (T.P.I.) can be ordered, but standard serrations come as 10 T.P.I.

Shoulder:

A shoulder is measured from the top of the cut edge of a punch down to the solid base. Most machines shoulders should be flush with the dieboard. In terms of self-cleaning punches, the longer the shoulder, the weaker the punch gets. This is because the pressure required to push the slugs through a long shoulder could lead to punch breaking.

Springs:

A method of ejecting the scrap from punches is the use of a spring. The spring usually protrudes 1/16″ above the cut edge of the punch. Springs are most common in tubing punches, but can be used in virtually in a style of punch.

Support Bevels:

A support bevel is very critical to the performance and life of the punch. This bevel will add strength as well as stop chipping or rolling of the punch’s cut edge.

Undercut:

All self-cleaning and feed thru punches must have undercuts. This will reduce the pressure it takes for the punch to remove slugs. If the undercut is inadequate, the punch may break or work as a cavity punch leaving the slug in the work rather than removing it.

Wall Thickness:

The wall thickness refers to the thickness between the base and the inside diameter of the punch. The wall thickness is dependent on the material used and the style of punch. The thicker the wall, the stronger the punch will be. The most common wall thickness is .065 which is comparable to 4pt rule. This wall thickness is needed for maximum strength on the standard applications, but can vary depending on your specific application.

How to Order

Helpful additional Information for Custom Parts:

(The more information that you give us will provide us with a better understanding of what exactly you need)

  • What is the job that you are doing?
  • What kind of die are you using?
  • What are the quantity of pieces being cut?
  • Are you using a new or old die?
  • Do you want to keep the slug or the outside shape?
  • What type of press are you using?
  • What is the thickness of the dieboard?
  • Is the shape mirrored?
  • Are there adhesives or liners?
  • Is the punch used for kiss cutting?
  • Are there any restrictions due to rule, other punches or spaces between cuts?
Helpful Hints:
  • Standard punches are easily ordered by looking at our catalog or ordering off of our website
  • If you fax or email your order, please include:
  • Company name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • FAX number
  • Person to contact
  • Date and Purchase Order number
  • When sending a print, make sure that all of the dimensions are included on the print.
  • Do not be afraid to ask questions!! We are here to help.
Necessary Information for Custom Parts:
  • Quantity
  • Height
  • Cut size
  • Style (i.e. tube, feed thru, side outlet, serrated, etc.)
  • Material being cut (Type, Thickness, Single or Multiple Layers)
  • Sketch or Print (DXF, PDF, or any file with dimensions we can use to draw a print ourselves)
Necessary Information for Custom Parts:
  • Quantity
  • Height
  • Cut size
  • Style (i.e. tube, feed thru, side outlet, serrated, etc.)
  • Material being cut (Type, Thickness, Single or Multiple Layers)
  • Sketch or Print (DXF, PDF, or any file with dimensions we can use to draw a print ourselves)
Helpful additional Information for Custom Parts:

(The more information that you give us will provide us with a better understanding of what exactly you need)

  • What is the job that you are doing?
  • What kind of die are you using?
  • What are the quantity of pieces being cut?
  • Are you using a new or old die?
  • Do you want to keep the slug or the outside shape?
  • What type of press are you using?
  • What is the thickness of the dieboard?
  • Is the shape mirrored?
  • Are there adhesives or liners?
  • Is the punch used for kiss cutting?
  • Are there any restrictions due to rule, other punches or spaces between cuts?
Helpful Hints:
  • Standard punches are easily ordered by looking at our catalog or ordering off of our website
  • If you fax or email your order, please include:
  • Company name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • FAX number
  • Person to contact
  • Date and Purchase Order number
  • When sending a print, make sure that all of the dimensions are included on the print.
  • Do not be afraid to ask questions!! We are here to help.
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